Friday, 30 May 2014

Blogification

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The current Liebster round appears to be reaching epidemic proportions. It’s set me thinking about wargames blogging (or maybe blogging in general) as a pursuit because wargaming is a very visual hobby and, at first glance, might not be best suited to support its own little solar system in the blogging universe.

It’s a fairly lonely pursuit, this wargaming thing. Even with access to a club or regular opponents, the gamer will spend the vast majority of his or her hobby time on support activities such as prep work and painting, churning out miles of model roads or, not least of all, reading. Consequently, this involves hours of relative isolation during which the mind is wont to wander despite DVD’s, MP3’s or dreams of empire. This wondering often develops theories, re-runs past traumas or glories, nurtures ambitions or magnifies small objects of desire. The outcome can sometimes lead to frustration, sometimes to bewilderment, but most frequently to silence. When wargamers gather there is often little time to expound theories because their aim is to apply the lancet of a wargame.

So, what to do about these unspoken thoughts? There must be many a gamer who has wandered through life wondering if his or her thoughts on the hobby were unique, profound or just damned stupid. That is until those same thoughts appear in someone’s blog and the realization dawns that you’re not so bloody clever after all. Although there is always a certain amount of froth along with substance, the ensuing comments and online conversations form friendships, occasional differences, generate inspiration or share techniques and information. The drivers for bloggers aren’t common though, be it self-aggrandizement, a record of achievement, publicity for enterprises or projects or simply a cathartic exercise - it’s amusing that many bloggers volunteer information they wouldn’t divulge to their spouse or colleagues so it’s sometimes a sort of online confessional. Still, it’s a broad church, which can accommodate all.

18 comments:

  1. Well said Gary, I have found the blogging has taken some of the loneliness feelings away due to the engagement and interaction with like minded people. I like the way ideas and projects are shared among the community that has developed

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    1. There are some cracking ideas and techniques posted and it's all done on the assumption that it will be of use to someone. That's a creditable state of affairs.

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  2. Good post Gary, I never really worried about the on your own side but blogging has given me a lot more feedback and real friends I would not have had before. Looking forward to seeing you at Partizan this Sunday

    Ian

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    1. I'm quite happy with my own company, but even I have to admit there's a good atmos about blogging - at least among the usual suspects.

      Yep, see you Sunday. Got your wellies?

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  3. I must admit that I've been thrilled with how blogging has developed my interest, knowledge and even social circle regarding all things hobby. Loved the line "realization dawns that you’re not so bloody clever after all" - so very true!

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    1. If I had a penny for every time my stroke of genius turned out to be common knowledge . . . .

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  4. Totally agree, friendship, laughter and how many fecking good painters and madmen there are out there!

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    1. If this lot are mad I'd sign my own committal papers!

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  5. Good post mate, enjoyed reading that. I'd be lost without my Blog to be honest. I'd never have met Posties Rejects and would almost certainly have trundled on alone and unloved (ahhhhh) for years to come. I do feel a sence of 'community' online, even if I'll never meet in person most of the people I know in the Bloggosphere. I have struck up some good friendships (yes, even Fran) and branched out in my hobby in a way I don't think I would have done had I been completely alone and offline.

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    1. I think you need the interplay with other to develop a decent perspective on the hobby and, probably more importantly, to widen your horizons.

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  6. Too true. Good post Gary. If you hadn't already received one I would have liebstered you.

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    1. "I would have liebstered you" - Look, I know what you mean, but that's not really the sort of thing you should put on a public forum . . . .

      ;O)

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  7. Yep , it good to know there others out there with equally as mad cap thought and ideas. Meeting up with them throughBlog Con was like meeting up with old friends , the blog o sphere really works for us.

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  8. I think we're lucky to have the Blogcon mechanism. Even groups on Yahoo struggle to achieve something like that.

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  9. Blogging has opened up new avenues to approach the hobby, whether it be through discovering new painting techniques, wargames I would have never heard of or thought to play otherwise, expand my circle of "friends" to include souls that I shall never meet in person, but enjoy communicating with, and to find treasures in the form of resources I did not know existed.

    I have many posts that I have never posted, either due to time, laziness, or the moment passed. On the other hand, I do try to post as many of my gaming experiences as I can, in order to contribute to what others might read.

    I thoroughly enjoyed each of the interviews of my recent series (still awaiting one well known individual's response) and will be posting my own thoughts on the various answers when done. The more I learned about these gentlemen, the more I appreciated their own efforts in the hobby. The same applies to bloggers who would otherwise remain strangers to me.

    Thoughtful post!

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    1. Those interviews are really interesting and, to be honest, much better than a couple of recorded interviews I've heard.
      I know what yo mean about the moment passing. Tomorrow is the Partizan show and I'll think of plenty to scribble about on the drive home, but not get round to it because of other things encroaching.

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  10. Yup good post, blogging is another way to explore the hobby and hopefully gert some feedback on what your doing. The Liebster thang is quite good if only to see other blogs you may of missed. All good really

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  11. Ah a new victim! Ow do?

    Yes, the Liebsters have put me on to a few more blogs I wasn't aware of and it certainly does not harm. There are some excellent blogs out there, but there are so many!

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